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Unsafe materials like toilet paper and rags too often become alternatives for people experiencing period poverty. Providing free period products to anyone who needs them makes it easier for them to fully participate in society. When governments distribute free period products, they are usually disposable pads and tampons.

Very rarely do they give out environmentally friendly alternatives like period underwear, menstrual discs, menstrual cups, and reusable pads.

Education, adequate water and sanitation facilities, and addressing harmful gender norms are necessary, too. But making period products more accessible is one step toward addressing period poverty. In November , Scotland became the first country to provide tampons and sanitary pads to anyone who needs them.

Scottish Labour MSP Monica Lennon led the effort through the Period Products Free Provision Scotland Bill. People who menstruate can access period products at community centers, youth clubs, and pharmacies.

The measure came after the country became the first to start providing period products in schools in Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced in February that all schools in the country would start providing free tampons and pads in June.

The move was an attempt to increase school attendance and address poverty head-on, she said. In , the Australian government announced a plan to provide free pads and tampons in all public schools.

Victoria became the first Australian state to implement the scheme in The education ministry said the law would make schools more inclusive and help break down period stigma.

New South Wales followed suit and launched a trial in the state in March to test the most effective way to roll out free period products in schools. Assembly Member Linda Rosenthal championed the bill. Inspired by a history project on period poverty, high school graduate Caroline Dillon helped write Senate Bill alongside Sen.

Martha Hennessey. The bill went into law in Several other states jumped on the bandwagon in The Virginia Senate unanimously passed Bill in January , requiring schools that teach middle school to high school students to provide period products free of charge in bathrooms.

Then Washington Governor Jay Inslee signed a bill in May , requiring that public schools, colleges, and universities make free menstrual products available to all genders starting in the school year. Most recently, Illinois Governor J.

Pritzker signed House Bills , , and into law in August to ensure that free period products be provided in college bathrooms and at shelters for people experiencing homeless. Not long after, in February , French universities were instructed to install free tampon and pad dispensers following a recommitment to the initiative by French President Emmanuel Macron in December Student organizations helped implement the government policy.

The decision to support the effort came after two years of parliamentary debate on the issue. Global Citizens started calling on the South African government to address period poverty in August and took more than , actions as part of the campaign.

By October , Finance Minister Mboweni eliminated the tampon tax and committed to providing free period products in schools. Several provinces already provided free pads to students but additional governmental funding helped more provinces get on board.

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Currently, 25 states and Washington D.C. have passed legislation to help students who menstruate have free access to period products while in school (as of Access Period, Omaha, Nebraska. likes · 93 talking about this. Access Period provides free menstrual products to anyone who needs them in Nebraska To combat this, Access Period provides free menstrual products to those in need. One way that Access Period does this is by hosting events

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To combat this, Access Period provides free menstrual products to those in need. One way that Access Period does this is by hosting events There is no good reason why this bill, which would allow homeless people, incarcerated people, students, and federal employees free access to A study in the medical journal BMC Women's Health found that 14% of college students struggle to access period products on a regular basis: Free access period
















Free Organic Food Samples Sponsor. Frree Washington Governor Jay Inslee signed a bill in May accesa, requiring periox public schools, colleges, and universities Budget-conscious grocery purchases free menstrual products psriod to all genders starting in the school year. Period products for people who need them. Hampton, Kleberg Riley, Edd, Lake Highlands, White Rock Trail, Larry Johnson Recreation Center, Dixon Ave. Prairie Creek, Lake June Rd. However, under current federal policy, menstrual supplies are not eligible purchases under SNAP or WIC. One participants specifically suggested using social media as a tool to promote the change on campus,. Strengths and limitations Qualitative methods led to an in-depth analysis of attitudes towards menstruation and methods in which menstruation can be safely managed. Yes No. Governor Murphy Signs Bill to Provide Access to Free Menstrual Products for Students in Grades Six through Twelve. More states consider free tampons in school bathrooms. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced in February that all schools in the country would start providing free tampons and pads in June. Correspondence to Meghana Rawat. Currently, 25 states and Washington D.C. have passed legislation to help students who menstruate have free access to period products while in school (as of Access Period, Omaha, Nebraska. likes · 93 talking about this. Access Period provides free menstrual products to anyone who needs them in Nebraska To combat this, Access Period provides free menstrual products to those in need. One way that Access Period does this is by hosting events Currently, 25 states and Washington D.C. have passed legislation to help students who menstruate have free access to period products while in school (as of The United for Access campaign has sparked successful initiatives to provide period products, free of charge, in campus bathrooms in Austin, Davis, Columbus and Access Period, Omaha, Nebraska. likes · 93 talking about this. Access Period provides free menstrual products to anyone who needs them in Nebraska This free Ebook gives you 10 ways you can fight period poverty in your workplace and in the Omaha community Access Period has distributed more than , free period products in Nebraska. We provide 3-month kits with tampons or pads, liners, personal wipes, and Access Period provides free period products to Nebraskans through statewide Access Points, community partnerships, and schools. · ⏱️ There are less than 24 hours Free access period
News Accfss. Diablo IV. On Perioe national scale, United States policy Bargain groceries online laws maintain the inaccessibility of menstrual hygiene xccess to Free Organic Food Samples of the most vulnerable groups of menstruating individuals: those who experience poverty, unstable housing, and incarceration [ 1415 ]. Everyone will feel good with it. An exploration of market organic sanitary products for improving menstrual health and environmental impact. Table 1 Findings Full size table. How can we address period poverty? All Supported Maps and Modes The full list of maps, modes, and Playlists that will be available to Free Access players includes: 6v6 Core Maps: Terminal, Rust, Highrise, Shipment, Afghan, Meat. Canty, Kiest, S. In November , Scotland became the first country to provide tampons and sanitary pads to anyone who needs them. One man was killed and another was injured in a single vehicle crash in Lincoln County. QUICK LINKS. White Rock Hills Branch Library, Ferguson Road. Currently, 25 states and Washington D.C. have passed legislation to help students who menstruate have free access to period products while in school (as of Access Period, Omaha, Nebraska. likes · 93 talking about this. Access Period provides free menstrual products to anyone who needs them in Nebraska To combat this, Access Period provides free menstrual products to those in need. One way that Access Period does this is by hosting events MW3 Season 2 Multiplayer and Zombies are going free to play for a limited time. Players can jump into Modern Warfare 3 Zombies and By working to address 'period poverty' through convenient and free access to menstrual hygiene products in our schools, this legislation A study in the medical journal BMC Women's Health found that 14% of college students struggle to access period products on a regular basis Currently, 25 states and Washington D.C. have passed legislation to help students who menstruate have free access to period products while in school (as of Access Period, Omaha, Nebraska. likes · 93 talking about this. Access Period provides free menstrual products to anyone who needs them in Nebraska To combat this, Access Period provides free menstrual products to those in need. One way that Access Period does this is by hosting events Free access period
Park in Feee Woods, Frree. No Free access period Announcement. Stay on top of latest health news from Harvard Medical School. Article Google Scholar Bobel C, Fahs B. A study into public awareness of the environmental impact of menstrual products and product choice. On a national scale, United States policy and laws maintain the inaccessibility of menstrual hygiene products to some of the most vulnerable groups of menstruating individuals: those who experience poverty, unstable housing, and incarceration [ 14 , 15 ]. BMC Women's Health ISSN: Limitations of this study include menstrual management products being restricted to pads and tampons. However, one participant saw this as a lesser priority, stating:. In, June , Delaware passed a bill expanding the provision to provide products to schools with 4th and 5th graders. Currently, 25 states and Washington D.C. have passed legislation to help students who menstruate have free access to period products while in school (as of Access Period, Omaha, Nebraska. likes · 93 talking about this. Access Period provides free menstrual products to anyone who needs them in Nebraska To combat this, Access Period provides free menstrual products to those in need. One way that Access Period does this is by hosting events A study in the medical journal BMC Women's Health found that 14% of college students struggle to access period products on a regular basis free menstrual products in 50% of female bathrooms. In , Utah passed HB providing period products free of charge to students in each access codes. Important Information about day free Access: The day free access period begins on the day you register for the course. Any work you (Free Period) is a volunteer led and staffed ministry offered by St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, MA. We distribute products through MA based Community A study in the medical journal BMC Women's Health found that 14% of college students struggle to access period products on a regular basis The United for Access campaign has sparked successful initiatives to provide period products, free of charge, in campus bathrooms in Austin, Davis, Columbus and Free access period

Free access period - Access Period provides free period products to Nebraskans through statewide Access Points, community partnerships, and schools. · ⏱️ There are less than 24 hours Currently, 25 states and Washington D.C. have passed legislation to help students who menstruate have free access to period products while in school (as of Access Period, Omaha, Nebraska. likes · 93 talking about this. Access Period provides free menstrual products to anyone who needs them in Nebraska To combat this, Access Period provides free menstrual products to those in need. One way that Access Period does this is by hosting events

We partner with existing non-profits to reach those experiencing the greatest need. Join other advocates working hard to eliminate period poverty. Give people back their lives and dignity by providing free menstrual products with Access Period.

With partners like:. Make your first donation. Any amount helps! We purchase menstrual products and distribute them through local non-profits. Help people get back to life without shame or stigma. No one should have to put their life on hold each month because they lack menstrual products.

Be a part of the solution. This free Ebook gives you 10 ways you can fight period poverty in your workplace and in the Omaha community. Period products for people who need them. Make a big impact, no strings attached. Address a Major Local Need We partner with existing non-profits to reach those experiencing the greatest need.

Promoting menstrual equity in our schools is one crucial component of our ongoing efforts to ensure the success of young people throughout our state and promote equity at every level.

If deemed necessary, the department can then issue a recommendation regarding the expansion of access to free menstrual products in grades below grade six. In , the Administration required menstrual hygiene products to be provided free of charge to female inmates in the state correctional system.

In addition, the Department of Health has created a website to provide residents with critical information about common menstrual health-related matters. Angelica Allen-McMillan, Acting Commissioner of Education. By providing free access to these essential products, we are not only promoting health and well-being but also erasing a potential source of discomfort and stigma.

This step underscores our dedication to fostering an environment where all students can focus on their education without the burden of unmet basic needs.

It is a stride towards a more just and inclusive educational experience. Kaitlan Baston. More information on period issues and products can be found at nj.

When this becomes an obstacle and decisions are made to not attend school, the loss is greater than just the one day. It is about the stigma young girls face around this natural monthly occurrence. This new policy will help to address period poverty and the stigmas around menstruation head on.

Providing students with menstrual products is not only the right thing to do, but it is also good public policy that has been proven to lower school absentee rates.

I thank Governor Murphy for signing this legislation, which will ensure future generations of New Jersey students have access to proper hygiene products.

NJ coalition. We thank both Governor Murphy and our champion, Senate Majority Leader Ruiz for helping ensure that all students will have equal access to education enabling them to reach their full potential, irrespective of gender or family income level.

Free access period - Access Period provides free period products to Nebraskans through statewide Access Points, community partnerships, and schools. · ⏱️ There are less than 24 hours Currently, 25 states and Washington D.C. have passed legislation to help students who menstruate have free access to period products while in school (as of Access Period, Omaha, Nebraska. likes · 93 talking about this. Access Period provides free menstrual products to anyone who needs them in Nebraska To combat this, Access Period provides free menstrual products to those in need. One way that Access Period does this is by hosting events

If they try to extend the life of products by using them for multiple hours at a time, they can wind up with vulvar irritation and vaginal discomfort. They may also be at greater risk for toxic shock syndrome , a life-threatening infection. We need to address stigma around menstruation in order to understand and fix the challenges people face around access to menstrual hygiene products.

Period poverty is real. Period equity should be real, too. Embarrassment or taboos may prevent people from advocating for themselves, but if that stigma is removed — or even eased by talking through these issues — we as a society can move forward to address the needs of half of our population. There is no equity when half the population bears the financial and physical distress as a consequence of the reproductive cycle needed to ensure human survival.

There are simple solutions to period poverty. The first is to eliminate the tax on menstrual products. Think about it: just as food, a necessity for all of us, is not taxed, menstrual products should not be taxed.

Products that are reusable, such as menstrual cups or underwear, should be subsidized, and their use encouraged, to eliminate excess waste from individually wrapped pads and tampons. If these products are publicized, promoted, and affordable, more women may opt for them. Pads and tampons should be available free of charge in schools and federal buildings note: automatic download.

Finally, you can take action: write to or call your legislators! There is a fantastic bill, Menstrual Equity For All Act of , sponsored by Representative Grace Meng, that was introduced on March 26, , but never received a vote.

There is no good reason why this bill, which would allow homeless people, incarcerated people, students, and federal employees free access to menstrual hygiene products, was never even brought forward for a vote.

We live in one of the world's wealthiest countries, and lack of menstrual hygiene products should never impact someone's ability to work or go to school. It's time to stop treating people with a uterus as second-class citizens. Huma Farid, MD , Contributor.

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Participants gave various opinions regarding what products should be stocked in the dispensers. Contradictions like these highlight the need for product options within the dispensers. Having quality choices within the dispensers can alleviate this fear of cheap or irritating materials that may not provide the desired absorbency, as this program aims to ease the stress and burdens menstruators face.

When location was brought up in the focus group discussions, expansion into all restrooms was the main topic of discussion. One participant expressed,. Some participants knew there were free products in dispensers around campus but were not aware of the policy.

Participants reported accidentally finding the dispensers in a university building restroom and appreciated their presence but noted that they had missed the news around the policy. These quotes indicated that while a policy was launched, there was need to increase awareness about the products within the university campus.

Specifically, as Purdue University had changed the old machines to free product machines, students reported being unaware about the change due to lack of advertisement.

One participants specifically suggested using social media as a tool to promote the change on campus,. Increasing awareness of the period policy including when and where to access free products may lead to further positive experiences and feedback from menstruators on campus.

When asking focus group participants how to raise awareness of this program and policy, one person stated,.

Since you might already be looking there if you forget that you have a product or if you forget a product. Another participant echoed this, stating,. Commenting on promoting the availability of free menstrual management products, other students added that there may be other places in the bathroom where the university can advertise other than the old dispensers.

They added,. Going off that I would say the best place to put the signs would be like between the mirrors where they have the abuse signs.

Implementing wording like this can help ease the hesitancy some may experience when wanting to utilize a free menstruation product dispenser, as the intended use and target audience were shown to be unclear to some.

Mass advertising outside of the restroom can also mitigate this uncertainty when dealing with the dispensers. Another participant articulated that the free products provided mental security,. Participants noted that not having access to period products on campus can make menstruators have uncomfortable situations, sometimes forcing them to choose between their education and going home to get a product.

Other participants shared feelings of support and reduced stress. Providing free menstrual products in campus restrooms supports community menstruators and helps open conversations and decrease stigma surrounding menstrual health.

Some participants suggested that the free period product policy at Purdue University indicated that attitudes regarding menstruation are becoming more open. Participants specifically reported that before coming to the university, they experienced social stigma around menstruation.

While the overall feeling was of Purdue University becoming a more period-positive space, one participant shared that the region where the university is located still bears some discomfort around the topic of menstruation,. This indicates that further work is needed to decrease stigma and expand open conversations regarding menstruation at this university.

The impact on access and culture at Purdue University suggests that broader impacts could be achieved as other universities and communities implement similar programs. Another participant phrased the conversations and studies around menstruation as progress,.

This highlights the broader cultural shifts as product access continues to be expanded and further normalized. Even so, stigma and shame surrounding menstruation run deep. This highlights the importance of open dialogue around menstruation to further destigmatize it.

Menstruation is normal and the focus groups recognized an overall shift in the attitudes toward it. As access and conversations expand, communities can make progress in normalizing and safely managing menstruation.

Participants expressed interest in having the general public implement similar policies to assist ending period poverty and making products accessible for everyone. Implementing free menstruation management products in public restrooms is a great way to support menstruators in the community.

This study set out to explain how menstruator experiences are intertwined with the socio-cultural conversations around menstruation, such as accessibility of products in a university setting. Researchers conducted virtual focus group discussions to understand menarche and menstruation attitudes and experiences and the impact of a community-based period policy at a large, Midwestern university.

Through the focus groups, we identified that students reacted positively about access to free menstrual management products and policy implementation and reported broader cultural impacts of access to free products in their university.

Participants provided insights into how the current menstrual product program could be improved moving forward by suggesting promotion strategies and highlighting the implications of the policy at a community level. This study emphasizes and supports the need to access menstrual products in public spaces.

However, nearly half of the participants in the focus group discussions were unaware of the period policy launched in early February of As will be acknowledged in the limitations, due to SARS COV2 pandemic campus closures in March, students did not have enough time to explore the campus and know about the policy.

However, the closures afforded researchers some time to conduct product testing of the menstrual products and identify unique ways to promote the policy as well as understand the socio-cultural impact of free menstrual product policies. As the policy was in its early stages, the champions for the policy saw as opportunity it receive feedback on the types of products they should place in the dispensers as quality of products continue to be an important cause in the goal to achieve period equity [ 63 ].

These conversations on quality led to further feedback on the larger infrastructure around menstruation management. First, participants expressed apprehension about using the product dispensers due to past experiences where they needed to pay for the product which sometimes was empty and did not dispense the products.

Participants also emphasized the importance of spreading awareness of the modified dispensers and dispenser sanitation and upkeep. These comments align with findings from other studies that free products succeed when adequate infrastructural developments complement the change [ 20 ].

Participants who were aware of the policy or placement of free menstrual products offered positive feedback and mentioned feeling supported by their community. This finding aligns with other studies that advertisements for the policy contribute to observational learning and behavioural modelling, which promote the use of these free products [ 20 ].

Openly discussing menstruation management in public spaces could help reduce the stigma menstruators face [ 43 , 46 ], improve self-efficacy, and thus allow for better product access. Along with champions and financial support as highlighted by Gruer et al.

Similar policies can be implemented in other communities to increase access and reduce stigma, specifically by including feedback from the community. While menstruation is often perceived as a shameful phenomenon [ 43 , 46 ], this study suggests that period policies help to normalize menstruation and make it easier to talk about.

These goals are evident in ongoing advocacy for better menstrual health and hygiene, which demands that these topics are included in conversations about health on both local and global levels [ 11 , 66 ]. Nearly all 50 states have seen legislation introduced to improve menstruation management safety and access [ 67 ].

There are also calls for global standardization of these policies [ 13 , 30 ]. They also highlighted that Scots preferred eco-friendly products and better advertisement of the scheme so that those who need the products an seek them out easily [ 10 ].

Open conversations help cultivate more positive menstrual experiences, a better understanding of menstruation, and increased advocacy for menstruation management needs.

This study presents various key considerations for successfully implementing an effective free period product policy and program in a university setting. While there are several studies and legislations specifically targeting middle and high school students, the findings from this study can provide an example for other universities seeking to replicate such efforts at new campuses.

Participants asserted that it is important to have a menstruator or someone who has experienced menstruation in the position that makes decisions regarding policies and the products they supply. While it is reasonably impossible to provide a full set of product options due to budget constraints [ 15 ], decisions on the product type and quality must be formed from an intimate knowledge of menstruation management.

Knowledge gaps were identified among participants regarding awareness of the policy itself along with confusion about details such as location, intended use, and available products. Advertising with flyers or magnets inside bathroom stalls, on product dispensers, between bathroom mirrors, online, and in highly trafficked areas of the university were all suggestions by participants to better inform the community.

It is also important that the intended use and target audience are made clear in these advertisements to ease any hesitancy of taking products, along with the type and brand of product. If universities have old coin dispensers in place, they may appear unreliable to users. Therefore, advertising that the products are free and stocked should be ensured by the universities.

Participants stressed the importance of product quality, variety, and brand, so these characteristics must be thoughtfully considered for effective implementation. Qualitative methods led to an in-depth analysis of attitudes towards menstruation and methods in which menstruation can be safely managed.

Limitations of this study include menstrual management products being restricted to pads and tampons. Other menstrual products such as period panties and cups were briefly discussed in focus groups but not provided for free in public spaces.

Findings may be limited to settings or communities such as that of a large Midwestern university where the study took place, especially given that this study solely included student-menstruators and not employee-menstruators. Additionally, while we preferred to use the all-inclusive term, menstruators, our participant base consists of cis-gender women menstruators only.

Future studies will benefit by examining the impact of access of menstrual management products by students identifying as transgender and non-binary. Despite limitations, the study provides insight into the feasibility and effects of period policies in communities.

Another major limitation of this study is that Purdue University launched the policy at the cusp of the shut down due to the SARS COV2 global pandemic. As students started to leave the campus and residential halls during the pandemic, the participants in this study could have experienced recall bias in remembering where and when free products were located.

Future research should investigate access to menstrual products in public spaces in other regions and communities and among diverse community members. Previous studies conducted in public schools have highlighted that students from the minority communities experience higher level of period poverty and benefit from access to free menstrual products [ 10 ].

Further evaluation on how students from lower socio-economic backgrounds benefit from free menstrual product policy will expand our understanding.

Additionally, as, participants in focus groups shared dissenting opinions on product preferences and quality, future research should also investigate which products should be provided to menstruators for an optimal experience.

Further, future research should explore product dispenser sanitation and upkeep. This study offers insights into the struggles of managing menstruation in public places and the impacts of a program offering free menstruation products at a large, Midwestern university.

Findings contribute practical recommendations to improve awareness, understanding, and implementation of a free product policy. The results suggest broader implications of period policies increasing access to products and supporting menstruators in universities and other communities by alleviating social stigma and positively affecting menstrual experiences.

Crawford B. Tampon taxes, discrimination, and human rights. Pace Law Fac Publ. Ooi J. Bleeding women dry: tampon taxes and menstrual inequity. Northwest Univ Law Rev. Google Scholar. Morales C. Eliminates tax on tampons and other sanitary products.

The New York Times. Tarabay J. Tampon tax finally ends in Australia. Eddy M. Germany says it will lower the taxes on tampons. Calfas J. More states consider free tampons in school bathrooms. Wall St J. Crawford BJ, Johnson ME, Karin ML, Strausfeld L, Waldman EG. The Ground on Which We All Stand: A Conversation About Menstrual Equity Law and Activism.

Mich J Gender L. Wall LL. Period poverty in public schools: a neglected issue in adolescent health. J Adolesc Health. Article PubMed Google Scholar. Schmitt ML, Hagstrom C, Gruer C, Nowara A, Keeley K, Adenu-Mensah NE, et al.

J Adolesc Res. Schmitt ML, Hagstrom C, Nowara A, Gruer C, Adenu-Mensah NE, Keeley K, et al. The intersection of menstruation, school and family: Experiences of girls growing up in urban areas in the U.

Int J Adolesc Youth. Article Google Scholar. Goldberg ML. UN Dispatch. Accessed 4 Mar Secor-Turner M, Huseth-Zosel A, Ostlund R.

Menstruation experiences of middle and high school students in the Midwest: a pilot study. J Sch Nurs. Sommer M, Caruso BA, Sahin M, Calderon T, Cavill S, Mahon T, et al. PLOS Med. Article PubMed PubMed Central Google Scholar. The Unequal Price of Periods: Menstrual Equity in the United States.

American Civil Liberties Union. Accessed 19 May Gruer C, Hopper K, Smith RC, Kelly E, Maroko A, Sommer M. Seeking menstrual products: a qualitative exploration of the unmet menstrual needs of individuals experiencing homelessness in New York City. Reprod Health.

Mullins D, Nagel J. Bloody necessary: climate change, menstruation, and emergency planning in Kansas. Cardoso LF, Scolese AM, Hamidaddin A, Gupta J.

Period poverty and mental health implications among college-aged women in the United States. BMC Womens Health. Update on Menstrual Equity Policies in the United States.

Accessed 16 May Weiss-Wolf J. Marie Claire Magazine. Schmitt ML, Booth K, Sommer M. A policy for addressing menstrual equity in schools: a case study from New York City, U.

Front Reprod Health. Bangert D. Purdue agrees to put free tampons in campus restrooms after three-year push by students. J Cour. Accessed 30 Jul Purdue University Senate February Meeting Minutes.

Peters T. Purdue forgoes final vote, will begin offering free feminine hygiene products in bathrooms. WLFI News. Purdue Today. Purdue University Senate Resolution February Accessed 13 Apr Accessed 23 Aug ABC News. Purdue University to offer free tampons, pads in bathrooms. Accessed 9 Mar Purdue University Senate March Meeting Minutes.

Yeginsu C. Scotland set to be first country to provide free pads and tampons. Student Spurs Brookline, Mass. Asmelash L, Ries B. Boston schools will offer free menstrual supplies for students starting this fall.

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